Requesting a change in child custody orders

After going to court in California regarding issues pertaining to custody or visitation, you might think that it’s a done deal. However, there are a few situations that can arise that might mean asking for the order to be changed. The following covers the situations that can change a child custody arrangement.

Relocating

One reason to ask the court for a change in the child custody arrangement would be if the custodial parent moves to a new location. Keep in mind that it’s not always guaranteed that the order will be changed, but if the move impacts the visitation schedule or would have an impact on the child’s well-being, then the court could consider it as a reason for the modification.

Following the terms

There are terms that are typically set forth in a custody or visitation agreement. If one parent doesn’t abide by those terms, then the other parent could request that the order be changed. Examples include the noncustodial parent not returning the child as scheduled or the custodial parent not allowing the other party to have the scheduled visitation time. In either case, you need to put together the proper forms of evidence against the other parent that indicate that the terms have not been followed as ordered.

Danger

If you feel that the child is in danger, then you can request that a change be made to the order. This is another situation where you want to have clear evidence instead of just going on a hunch that something is taking place with the other parent. Any kind of abuse or mental health concerns could warrant a change in the order.

When you’re trying to co-parent, you might need the court to step in when it comes to visitation and custody. If there are concerns from either party, the order could be changed at any time as long as there is evidence that the issue could impact the child’s life.

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